Copyright Compendium

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623.4 Timeline for Special Handling Requests

 

623.4 Timeline for Special Handling Requests

 

Once a request for special handling has been received, the U.S. Copyright Office will determine if the applicant paid the correct fee and provided a compelling justification for the request, as discussed in Section 623.2. If the applicant failed to pay the correct fee, failed to provide a compelling justification, or if the Office determines that special handling would be unduly burdensome, the Office will notify the applicant that the request has been denied and that the claim will be examined on a regular basis.

 

If the request for special handling is granted, the Office will make every attempt to examine the application or the document within five working days thereafter, although the Office cannot guarantee that all applications or all documents will be registered or recorded within that timeframe.

 

As a general rule, the Office will issue a certificate of registration or a certificate of recordation within five working days after the request for special handling has been granted, if it is clear that the material deposited constitutes copyrightable subject matter and that the other legal and formal requirements of U.S. copyright law have been met.

 

If there are questions or issues that prevent the Office from registering the work or recording the document, the Office generally will notify the party that submitted the application or document within five working days after the request for special handling has been granted. If the applicant responds to this communication, the Office will provide its response to the applicant’s communication(s) within a reasonable amount of time.

 

If it is clear that the requirements of the law have not been met, the Office will refuse to register the claim or will refuse to record the document. A refusal will be made in a written communication signed or initialed by the registration or recordation specialist or supervisor assigned to the claim or document. The communication will be mailed to the party that submitted the application or document. However, the Office cannot guarantee that a decision will be made or that the refusal will be issued within the timeframe specified above.